Neat Road Brake Caliper Installation Tip

I thought I would present a little tech trick in our shop (and probably others) that keeps a road brake caliper from rotating on its anchor bolt when bumped slightly or installing wheels.  One of our guys told everyone about it last year and since then, we have had great success with it.

It is quite simple and makes great sense. Usually there is a small serrated washer or smooth alloy washer placed on the anchor bolt between the caliper and the frame for both correct positioning and the use of a ‘softer’ metal to grip the caliper to the anchor nut from the frame.  See below.

Washer is placed over the anchor bolt hereBefore you place this washer onto the anchor bolt, apply a small amount of grip assembly paste to the surface at the base of the anchor bolt, as shown below.Applying the grip assembly paste with an acid brush

A little more than necessary, for visual purposes.

Then, install the alloy washer and apply a little more grip assembly paste to the side of the washer facing the frame or fork, shown below.

Installing the alloy washer Rear brake with grip assembly paste applied

That will give the brake much more staying power without any ill side effects.  The paste also helps protect carbon frame surface mounting points.  No more will that little bump while moving or transporting your bike knock the caliper out of alignment, which will help performance longevity after tuning and avoid uneven brake pad wear.  Hope this helps your shop or your own bikes as well as it has ours.

*****

One article I am currently working on deserves a little preview while assembling all of the material.  It’s based on reducing weight on your bike for the least and most practical cost.  For instance, we carry Specialized tubes in our shop of both the regular and lightweight turbo pre-talc’d styles.  I knew that the rubber quality is slightly higher in the turbo tubes and that they weighed somewhere below the regular ones.  So I weighed them to see exactly what the weight savings was.  A regular tube weighs out at about 100g.  The lightweight tube costs about two dollars more, yet comes in at only about 70g.  So, for four dollars, you can save 60g on your bike.  This alone doesn’t do much (though the ride quality will improve slightly), but a few tricks like this will add up to a considerable savings.  I know of a lot of much more expensive proportions of dollars/weight savings that might make sense when you have exhausted some of these more ‘stealth’ weight saving options.  More tips like this to come in the article.

– SNC

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2015 Campagnolo Record Preview

I got an excellent opportunity this morning to join my fellow mechanics and gaze at the new 2015 Campagnolo Record group brought by the US rep to explain new features and designs.  It really packed a punch aesthetically and is sure to be a powerhouse to compete with the other major drivetrains out there.  That being said — onto the good stuff!

The first component we looked at are the new shift/brake levers and how they differ from previous generations.  The hoods and body of the brifter are the same shape as the prior edition, but have small improvements.  The hood has a different pattern that contours the brifter better and helps to eliminate the ‘crease’ that some worn in hoods experience after heavy use.  This is also reflected on the inside of the hood where they created a thicker mesh under pressure points for better vibration dampening and a more secure fit.  A small print of “Campagnolo” is displayed in white at the outer front side of the hood.  Here are a couple photos:

The internals look basically the same with the exception of a different ratcheting shift mechanism that corresponds to the way the rear derailleur will travel up and down the cogs (actuation ratio).  This does mean that it is incompatible with the prior generation.

The crank was totally redesigned with the newer four arm spider made of carbon fiber and the chainrings each using 4 chainring bolts to attach to the arms.  This, along with the profiling of the top of each arm over the outer chainring is expected to confidently support the near 45Nm torque of the front derailleur shifting from the inner to the outer ring.  Also, I should note that the downshift is slightly different and acts much more like its electronic cousin, EPS.  When dropping from the outer ring the inner ring, the derailleur will drop to a low trim position — one slight click up from its innermost position.  This should help greatly in eliminating a chain dropping.  Here is a photo:

2015 Campagnolo Record 11 Crankset

Next was the front derailleur which ties into the prior paragraph about the 45Nm torque of the shift.  This is an improvement of about 10Nm more than the last generation and only 7Nm less than its EPS counterpart.  A 3D molded carbon cage exists on the Record and Super Record mechs and is an alloy cage on the Chorus level.  The improvement of the shifting power is mainly due to the added length of the arm used to anchor the cable.  Here’s a couple views:

The rear derailleur was definitely the best part about the entire presentation.  It boasts an incredibly light weight and features carbon fiber all over in both the Record and Super record levels.  The Chorus level will have an alloy outer parallelogram plate.  The reintroduction of a B-tension screw will help to eliminate differences in frame manufacturing specifications and allow the derailleur to be dialed in the exact same way on any number of bikes.  It’s best feature is a spline drive inside the anchor pivot that winds the spring tighter as the derailleur moves up and down the cogs.  Its benefit is to keep the upper pulley moving with the same curved slope of the cogs to prevent missed shifts and smoother transition.  Check it out:

Lastly, here are a few photos of the EPS bike with current generation Super Record 11 EPS:

What’s in the stand today?

This is what I was working on today….

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Specs are as follows:

Specialized SWORKS Shiv frameset with integrated aero brakeset, seatpost, and Sitero saddle.  This was a stock build I had etched up a few months back and it had been sitting on our Specialized wall with some grandeur.  It’s spec’d with a Dura-Ace 9000 groupset with time trial shifters.  Zipp Beyond Black stem was swapped for the standard stock stem setup in order to run a Zipp Vuka Bull base bar with TRP carbon brake levers and Fizik matte black tape.  The wheelset currently is a nice set of CXP80 Cosmics, but likely will be switched to Zipp 808s.  It’s a really great aero build that will be the epitome of stealth and craftsmanship.  Since I built it accordingly before, it’s been easy to set in the new cockpit and all that is left is to route the new cables and tune.  Other pressing projects intervened this build today including a Di2 upgrade on a Caad 10 Synapse frameset, a SWORKS lululemon Amira with Ultegra Di2, and an SWORKS hardtail Stumpjumper that needed a final bleed and hose replacement for Formula brakes front and rear.  That was also a great build last week that I should have a finals slideshow for tomorrow evening or Sunday.  Internal hydraulic routing and XX1 group with a nice tubeless setup.  Anyways, I’ve had a long week and got a lot of great projects out to happy riders and need some rest.  I’ll have a short article on some tech stuff that has been important to the industry lately tomorrow.  Thanks for checking things out!

-SNC

Pinarello Dogma Think 2 65HM1K Limited Edition World Champion Frameset

One of the guys I work with arrived early this afternoon to a surprise that his frameset had arrived earlier than expected from Italy.  As one of the most interesting people to work with in the industry I have met, I waited for his reaction to opening the box, eagerly handing scissors to cut the packaging.   It had been three months of waiting.  This is the first one to hit the United States.  It’s a limited edition Pinarello Dogma Think 2 65HM1K World Champion Edition frameset.  As far as I am concerned, there are lighter framesets out there and maybe even more elaborate paint jobs, but combine the two and you have this Dogma.  I installed the headset bearing, races, and spacers and ziptied the steerer tube so we could set it up for some photos.

For those of you reading who have never ridden a Pinarello Dogma (particularly I mention the Dogma due to its reputation above the other frames in Pinarello’s lineup, all of which, of course are also very good framesets), I would like you to envision the coolest tech gadget or hobby or passion you have and think of what the absolute best version of that in the entire world would be.  Got it?  This is one of the best designed bicycle frames in the entire world.  I was really happy to be there at the right time to see it.  The asymmetric carbon frame is made by a company called Torayca.  Their use of Pinarello’s designed 65HM1K carbon fiber with Nanoalloy construction alloys them to create extremely responsive feel and strength in their frames.  For instance, carbon fiber ribbing stretches down the downtube near the bottom bracket on just the drive side to reinforce the unequal power distribution in the frame between right-side thrust (drive) + pull on chain and the left-side thrust (non-drive) + pull on chain.  Classic breaks on many carbon frames of the past have been implemented into the design to be reinforced in these areas as well, creating something truly race worthy or simply as the ultimate thrill of flying down descents and roads with less fatigue, better performance, and comfort all the way through.

It’s a beautiful frame in both form and function.  If you find an opportunity to ride one, do it.  Let’s put it this way, “I really hate my Pinarello.  It really just doesn’t ride well and I’ve had so many problems with it”  … said no one ever in my experience…

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